Who Played The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz

0
23
Who Played The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz

The Scarecrow is a made-up character from L. Frank Baum and W.W. Denslow’s 19th century novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its accompanying illustrations. The Scarecrow shows early on that he is brainless and desperately wants one. He’s only two days old, so he’s just naive at this point.

Who Played The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz

His intelligence is eventually recognised, and he is called “the wisest man in all of Oz,” but he still gives credit to the Wizard for it. He recognises his own limitations and is more than pleased to turn over the reins of power in Oz, which he inherited from the Wizard, to Princess Ozma. He now serves as one of her trusted advisors, albeit he spends more time partying than giving advice.

Contents

Who Played The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz

More than eight decades after its first release, The Wizard of Oz may still be one of the most widely cherished classic films of all time. However, despite the fact that the film has brought so much happiness to so many people over the years, its creation is surrounded by controversy. The production of the film has yielded a plethora of sad and gloomy anecdotes. One actor’s face was permanently scarred from playing the lovable rogue from L. Frank Baum’s books.

The actors and crew of “The Wizard of Oz,” while appearing in an enchanting picture, were subjected to appalling abuse while making the film. The production allegedly urged Judy Garland, who plays Dorothy Gale, to take narcotics to keep her going. The dog who plays Toto, Terry, was almost run over and killed.

In the case of The Wizard of Oz, the make-up disaster that befell several of the actors has become legendary. Margaret Hamilton, who plays the Wicked Witch of the West, and Jack Haley, who portrays the Tin Man, both experienced serious health impacts from the make-up they wore to transform into their characters. Others have also voiced dissatisfaction with the results.

Last Words

In 1984, when performing in Coronado, California, he said, “I stepped off from the stage and there was nothing there.” Something wasn’t right with my right hip. I was going to perform in another show, but I wasn’t feeling well enough, so I had to back out.

X-rays of his hip revealed that “the cartilage was practically gone,” as the doctor explained to him. A prosthetic hip was implanted in him.

Bolger kept up with the times by narrating a segment in the 1985 anthology film ′′That’s Dancing,′′ which included a Scarecrow dance that was removed from ′′The Wizard of Oz.